Tag Archives: power tool #1

When Did You First Know You Had Power?

Do keep on posting those wonderful stories of women in history who deserve greater recognition than they get.

Today, I also have an extra question to ask. I’m delivering the keynote address at an event that recognizes two very important women in history: Susan B. Anthony and Elizabeth Cady Stanton. I’ll be at the University of Rochester’s Stanton/Anthony Conversations, speaking on “How Women Use Power: Transforming Leadership.”

My question is: Was there a moment when you knew you had the power to….(you fill in the blank)? If so, what was it? If not, was there some other process that occurred to give you a sense of your own power to…(your words here)?

Thanks for sharing your thoughts.

Posted in Know Your History, Power Tools | Tagged , , , , , | 5 Comments

Writing Women Back Into History

On Monday I told you the story of Sybil Luddington, a Revolutionary War hero who has been all but erased from history. We all know who has written the history books, and how that has resulted in men getting to tell their version of events. But there are two sides to every story. Part of changing our relationship with power means that it’s time for women to reclaim our history, and write ourselves back into the history books.

Shelby Knox took some time to speak with me at my book launch last week about a woman who has inspired her: suffragist Matilda Joslyn Gage. Take a look at what Shelby has to say about Gage’s contributions to women’s history.

What women from history have inspired you? Whose shoulders are you standing on? I’d love to hear your stories in the comments section.

Posted in Know Your History, Power Tools | Tagged , , , , , | 8 Comments

Power Tool #1: Know Your History

Women’s history is the primary tool of their emancipation. ~Gerda Lerner

This week I’d love to know your thoughts about the first of the 9 Ways power tools, “Know your history and you can create the future of your choice.” Do you agree with that statement?

I wrote it because women have been all but written out of history. Yet we are always everywhere giving birth to everyone and doing all kinds of important things despite barriers.

Take the story of Sybil Luddington. At age sixteen, on April 26, 1777, Sybil rode through towns in New York and Connecticut warning that the British were coming. She gathered enough volunteers to beat back the British army the next day, and her ride was twice as long as Paul Revere’s. Yet, unless you live in the small Connecticut town named for her, it’s doubtful you’ve ever heard of her. Sometimes she is called the “female Paul Revere” but couldn’t he just as well be called “the male Sybil Luddington?”

How many women did you learn about in high school history classes? Bet you can count them on one hand without using all your fingers. So here’s your chance to rectify that. Tell 9 Ways readers (and me) about a woman or women in history that you feel wasn’t given her due by the history books.

We’re going to be talking about these questions all week. I’m looking forward to your thoughts and stories.

Posted in Know Your History, Power Tools | Tagged , , , , , | 15 Comments
Footer line
Copyright 2010 Gloria Feldt